Leitura para o fim-de-semana: o ghostwriter de Julian Assange

Andrew O’Hagan foi convidado para ser o ghostwriter da auto-biografia de Julian Assange.  Nessa qualidade passou longos momentos com o fundador da wikileaks. E o que conta pode parecer retirado de um livro de ficção. Mas não. O texto está escrito na primeira pessoa e foi publicado na London Review of Books.

Foto: Gian Paul Lozza

Foto: Gian Paul Lozza

Ghosting

Andrew O’Hagan

On 5 January 2011, at 8.30 p.m., I was messing about at home when the phone buzzed on the sofa. It was a text from Jamie Byng, the publisher of Canongate. ‘Are you about?’ it said. ‘I have a somewhat left-field idea. It’s potentially very exciting. But I need to discuss urgently.’ Canongate had bought, for £600,000, a memoir by the WikiLeaks founder, Julian Assange. The book had also been bought for a high sum by Sonny Mehta at Knopf in New York and Jamie had sold foreign rights to a slew of big houses. He said he expected it to be published in forty languages. Assange didn’t want to write the book himself but didn’t want the book’s ghostwriter to be anybody who already knew a lot about him. I told Jamie that I’d seen Assange at the Frontline Club the year before, when the first WikiLeaks stories emerged, and that he was really interesting but odd, maybe even a bit autistic. Jamie agreed, but said it was an amazing story. ‘He wants a kind of manifesto, a book that will reflect this great big generational shift.’ He’d been to see Assange in Norfolk and was going again the next day. He said he and the agent Caroline Michel had suggested me for the job and that Assange wanted to meet me. I knew they’d been talking to other writers, and I was at first sceptical. It’s not unusual for published writers to get requests to write things anonymously. How much did Alex Haley protect Malcolm X when he ghosted his autobiography? To what extent did Ted Sorensen create the verbal manner of John F. Kennedy when he wrote Profiles in Courage, a book for which the future president won the Pulitzer Prize? And are the science fiction stories H.P. Lovecraft ghosted for Harry Houdini not the best things he ever wrote? There would be a touch of all this in the strange case of Assange. But there is something else about the genre, a sense that the world might be more ghosted now than at any time in history. Isn’t Wikipedia entirely ghosted? Isn’t half of Facebook? Isn’t the World Wide Web a new ether, in which we are all haunted by ghostwriters?

I had written about missing persons and celebrity, about secrecy and conflict, and I knew from the start that this story might be an insider’s job. However it came, and however I unearthed it or inflected it, the Assange story would be consistent with my instinct to walk the unstable border between fiction and non-fiction, to see how porous the parameters between invention and personality are. I remembered Victor Maskell, the art historian and spy in John Banville’s The Untouchable, who liked to quote Diderot: ‘We erect a statue in our own image inside ourselves – idealised, you know, but still recognisable – and then spend our lives engaged in the effort to make ourselves into its likeness.’ The fact that the WikiLeaks story was playing out against a global argument over privacy, secrets and the abuse of military power, left me thinking that if anyone was weird enough for this story it was me.

At 5.30 the next day Jamie arrived at my flat with his editorial colleague Nick Davies. (Mental health warning: there are two Nick Davies in this story. This one worked for Canongate; the second is a well-known reporter for the Guardian.) They had just come back on the train from Norfolk. Jamie said that Assange had poked his eye with a log or something, so had sat through three hours of discussion with his eyes closed. They were going to advertise the book for April. It was to be calledWikiLeaks versus the World: My Story by Julian Assange. They said I would have a percentage of the royalties in every territory and Julian was happy with that. We talked about the deal and then Jamie went into detail about the security issues. ‘Are you ready to have your phone tapped by the CIA?’ he asked. He said Julian insisted the book would have to be written on a laptop that had no internet access.

When I arrived at Ellingham Hall Assange was fast asleep. He’d been living there, at the house of Vaughan Smith, one of his sureties and founder of the Frontline Club, since his arrest on Swedish rape allegations. He was effectively under house arrest and wearing an electronic tag on his leg. He would sign in at Beccles police station every afternoon, proving he hadn’t done a runner in the night. Assange and his associates kept hackers’ hours: up all night and asleep half the day, one of the little bits of chaos that would come to characterise the circus I was about to enter. Ellingham Hall is a draughty country residence with stags’ heads in the hall. In the dining room there were laptops everywhere. Sarah Harrison, Assange’s personal assistant and girlfriend, was wearing a woolly jumper and kept scraping her ringlets off her face. Another girl, maybe Spanish or South American or Eastern European, came into the drawing room where the fire was blazing. I stood at the windows looking at the tall trees outside.

Sarah made me a cup of tea and the other girl brought it into the room with a plate of chocolate biscuits. ‘I’m always trying to think of new ways to wake him up,’ she said. ‘The cleaner just barges in. It’s the only way.’ He soon came padding into the room in socks and a suit.

‘I’m sorry I’m late,’ he said. He was amused and suspicious at the same time, a nice combination I thought, and there were few signs of the mad unprofessionalism to come. He said the thing that worried him was how quickly the book had to be written. It would be hard to establish a structure that would work. He went on to say that he might be in jail soon and that might not be bad for writing the book. ‘I have quite abstract thoughts,’ he said, ‘and an argument about civilisation and secrecy that needs to be got down.’

He said he’d hoped to have something that read like Hemingway. ‘When people have been put in prison who might never have had time to write, the thing they write can be galvanising and amazing. I wouldn’t say this publicly, but Hitler wrote Mein Kampf in prison.’ He admitted it wasn’t a great book but it wouldn’t have been written if Hitler had not been put away. He said that Tim Geithner, the US secretary of the Treasury, had been asked to look into ways to hinder companies that would profit from subversive organisations. That meant Knopf would come under fire for publishing the book.

I asked him if he had a working title yet and he said, to laughter, ‘Yes. “Ban This Book: From Swedish Whores to Pentagon Bores.’ It was interesting to see how he parried with some notion of himself as a public figure, as a rock star really, when all the activists I’ve ever known tend to see themselves as marginal and possibly eccentric figures. Assange referred a number of times to the fact that people were in love with him, but I couldn’t see the coolness, the charisma he took for granted. He spoke at length about his ‘enemies’, mainly the Guardian and the New York Times.

Julian’s relationship with the Guardian, which appeared to obsess him, went back to his original agreement to let them publish the Afghan war logs. He quickly fell out with the journalists and editors there – essentially over questions of power and ownership – and by the time I took up with him felt ‘double-crossed’ by them. It was an early sign of the way he viewed ‘collaboration’: the Guardian was an enemy because he’d ‘given’ them something and they hadn’t toed the line, whereas the Daily Mail was almost respected for finding him entirely abominable. The Guardian tried to soothe him – its editor, Alan Rusbridger, showed concern for his position, as did the then deputy, Ian Katz, and others – but he talked about its journalists in savage terms. The Guardian felt strongly that the secret material ought to be redacted to protect informants or bystanders named in it, and Julian was inconsistent about that. I never believed he wanted to endanger such people, but he chose to interpret the Guardian’s concern as ‘cowardice’.”

O artigo completo está aqui.

Leitura para o fim-de-semana: o exílio de Julian Assange em Londres

Em Junho de 2012, Julian Assange refugiou-se na embaixada do Equador, em Londres, para evitar ser detido e extraditado para a Suécia, onde é procurado no âmbito de um processo de abuso sexual. O fundador da Wikileaks receia que essa investigação seja apenas um pretexto para o seu envio posterior para os Estados Unidos. E, desde então, nunca mais saiu da representação diplomática equatoriana. No entanto, isso não o fez parar: realizou uma série de entrevistas (transmitidas em O Informador, no ano passado), dirigiu-se à Assembleia Geral da ONU, escreveu um livro, candidatou-se ao senado australiano e, envolveu-se na fuga de Edward Snowden. Este artigo da Vanity Fair explica como. 

Foto da esquerda: OLIVIA HARRIS/REUTERS/LANDOV; Foto da direita: NEIL HALL/REX USA

Foto da esquerda: OLIVIA HARRIS/REUTERS/LANDOV; Foto da direita: NEIL HALL/REX USA


Julian Assange hasn’t set foot outside Ecuador’s London embassy in more than a year—avoiding extradition to Sweden, where he faces allegations of sexual assault. But physical confinement seems only to enhance his reach. The WikiLeaks founder has video-addressed the U.N., launched a Senate campaignin absentia in his native Australia, entertained Lady Gaga, and played a key role in the case of N.S.A. leaker Edward Snowden. As several movies depict aspects of Assange’s story, Sarah Ellison focuses on the center of his web.

I. Dead End

Every afternoon, at four o’clock, a small group of demonstrators gathers outside 3 Hans Crescent, in London’s Knightsbridge district, to protest the confinement of a man inside the embassy at that address. The man hasn’t set foot beyond the embassy since June 19, 2012, the day he walked through its doors to avoid extradition from Britain to another country, where he is facing allegations that, he contends, are merely a first step in his eventual extradition to the United States.

The man is Julian Assange, the 42-year-old Australian who is best known as the founder (in 2006) and public face of WikiLeaks, the nonprofit Web site that publishes previously secret material. In April, the organization released its largest trove to date, a database of approximately 1.7 million declassified diplomatic records from the years 1973 to 1976 that WikiLeaks refers to as “the Kissinger Cables.” In 2010, in partnership with The Guardian, Der Spiegel, The New York Times, and others, WikiLeaks began releasing more than 450,000 military documents relating to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan along with 250,000 U.S. diplomatic cables. The documents had been provided by Bradley Manning, an army private stationed in Iraq, who, when tried in military court, was found not guilty of “aiding the enemy” but guilty of espionage, theft, and computer fraud. Despite Manning’s statement that he had first tried to get his information to both The Washington Post and The New York Times, the prosecution argued that it was “obvious that Manning pulled as much information as possible to please Julian Assange,” and said that Assange “had found the right insider” in Manning. WikiLeaks is under investigation by the Justice Department, and there are reports that a sealed indictment exists for Assange himself. In the meantime, for the past year, he has been living in a small room—reportedly 15 feet by 13 feet—at the Ecuadoran Embassy, largely unseen by the public. He has most recently surfaced as a prominent adviser to Edward Snowden, a former “infrastructure analyst” at National Security Agency contractor Booz Allen Hamilton, who last June leaked details about top-secret U.S. surveillance programs to The Guardian and The Washington Post.

Assange’s living space, a former embassy office, is located on a ground-floor corner overlooking a small dead-end street. His window sits above one of the hundreds of thousands of security cameras that blanket London, and when I visited the embassy in June, two Metropolitan Police vans were parked just outside. WikiLeaks says the building is watched by about a dozen British police officers at any one time. According to Scotland Yard, the authorities have so far spent $6 million to keep Assange under a watchful eye (and to keep him in place at the embassy). Early on, officials from Britain’s Foreign Office were threatening to remove Assange from the embassy against his will. In his first two months there, the Ecuadoran consul, Fidel Narváez, slept at the embassy to serve as a diplomatic presence at all times and thereby “protect” Assange from the aggressive police attention. Narváez told The Prisma, a London-based newspaper published in both Spanish and English, that he got to know Assange well during that time. “It’s certainly true that we talked a lot over those months, especially at times when we were alone, at night,” Narváez said. In July, Ecuadoran intelligence found a microphone hidden in the office of the ambassador, Ana Albán. The intelligence officials were doing a routine search in preparation for a visit from the country’s foreign minister, Ricardo Patiño, who said that the device appeared to have been planted by a private investigation company, the Surveillance Group, Ltd., adding that the bugging represented “a loss of ethics at the international level in relations between governments.” The company has denied involvement.

Assange took refuge at the embassy in June 2012, shortly after he lost his bid in the British courts to prevent extradition to Sweden, where he is sought for questioning in relation to the alleged sexual assault of two women. (He has yet to be charged with a crime.) At first, Assange slept on an inflatable mattress on the floor that the ambassador brought from her own apartment nearby. Assange found that the noise from the street outside his window disturbed his sleep. After exploring the embassy for a quiet room, he settled on the women’s bathroom, where the embassy staff reluctantly removed the toilet so he could sleep there. He has a lamp that mimics natural light, to enhance his psychological well-being, and he jogs every day on a treadmill, a gift from the film director Ken Loach. The embassy has installed a shower for Assange’s use. There is a fireplace with a Victorian white mantel in his room, and a small round table of blond wood, on which Assange keeps his computer. Several shelves line the walls. Assange eats a combination of take-out food—he keeps the restaurants from which he orders secret, for fear his food might be poisoned—and simple Ecuadoran dishes prepared by the embassy staff. He is able to receive visitors, including Sarah Harrison, the 31-year-old WikiLeaks researcher who met up with Edward Snowden in Hong Kong, where Snowden initially hid from the American authorities, and helped deliver to him a temporary Ecuadoran travel document that Assange and Fidel Narváez had reportedly secured.

The Ecuadoran Embassy itself is modest—a suite of 10 rooms on a single floor of a red-brick Victorian pile, with no bedrooms and no facilities except a small kitchenette. For atmospherics, imagine the offices of a private upscale medical practice that for some reason is partial to flags of yellow, red, and blue. Assange’s diplomatic immunity does not extend to the lobby of the building, which is shared with the Colombian Embassy and some 15 well-appointed private apartments upstairs. The entrance to the Men’s Fragrance department at Harrods department store is just half a block away. The door to the embassy is thick black metal and opens immediately onto a full-body metal detector. A portrait of the Ecuadoran president, Rafael Correa, hangs on the walls, along with paintings of tropical birds. The government of Ecuador has stated that Assange is welcome to stay in its London embassy for “centuries.”

Last year, on July 3, the day he turned 41, Assange sent 12 pieces of birthday cake to the 12 protesters standing outside the embassy. On his birthday this year, people outside carried a sign noting that the number 42, in The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, is “the answer to Life, the Universe and Everything.” On ordinary days, protesters carry small signs with photos of Assange, his mouth taped shut by an American flag, and bearing slogans such as “Don’t Shoot the Messenger.” From time to time Assange appears in vaguely papal fashion at the front window, silver-haired and pale, and waves. He gives the occasional press conference from a small balcony. He recently showed up for an interview with Agence France-Presse wearing a coat and tie but no shoes, a gesture to underscore the fact that he has little need for them.

Even before the Snowden affair brought him back into the limelight, Assange had been busy. During his year of confinement at the embassy, he has released a vast cache of documents, written a book, addressed the U.N., founded a political party in Australia and launched a bid for a Senate seat there, entertained socialites and celebrities, maintained contact with leakers and whistle-blowers all over the world, and worked behind the scenes to influence depictions of him that are now hitting movie screens (the most high-profile being a DreamWorks production starring Benedict Cumberbatch). As for the Snowden case, Assange and WikiLeaks have served, in effect, as Snowden’s travel agents, publicists, and envoys; it is still not clear how far back the Snowden connection goes, or precisely how it originated, though the filmmaker Laura Poitras likely played the key role.

Assange cannot move from his quarters, but he is either at his computer or in conference, working in an impressive number of spheres. “He is like any other C.E.O.—plagued by constant meetings,” WikiLeaks told me. He employs sophisticated encryption software, which anyone wishing to make contact with him or his circle is encouraged to use. To gain a sense of his life and work, during the past months I have spoken to Assange’s lawyers and to many longtime or former friends, supporters, and professional associates. (Some have requested anonymity.) Daniel Ellsberg, the former U.S. military analyst who brought the Pentagon Papers to light, has met with Assange and speaks with personal knowledge about the lonely life of a leaker and whistle-blower. “We are exiles and émigrés,” he told me.

But the fact that Assange has had to take himself physically out of circulation has had the effect, oddly, of keeping him more purely at the center of things than he was before. His legal perils have not receded, but his state of diplomatic limbo means that he is no longer being hauled out of black vans and in front of screaming reporters and whirring cameras. The U.S. government has tried to decapitate his organization, which has only made him a martyr. No one is talking, as they were when he was free to mingle with the outside world, about his thin skin, his argumentative nature, his paranoia, his self-absorption, his poor personal hygiene, his habit of using his laptop when dining in company, or his failure to flush the toilet.

“If anything, I think he’s stronger and more sophisticated than he used to be, and so is the organization,” Jennifer Robinson, an Australian human-rights lawyer best known for her work defending Assange in London, told me. “They’ve weathered three years of intense pressure and all forms of legal and political attacks, and they are still here and still publishing and still making headlines.” Today, Assange is alone and unbothered, but not isolated—the unquiet center of a web whose vibrations he can both detect and influence.”

O artigo completo está aqui

Leitura para o fim-de-semana: o infiltrado do FBI na WikiLeaks

Sigurdur “Siggi” Thordarson era um dos protegidos de Julian Assange. Um dos seus rapazes de confiança. No entanto, o estagiário que o fundador da WikiLeaks jurou proteger em troca de lealdade absoluta, preferiu traí-lo e tornar-se num informador do FBI. É o próprio que o admite, neste artigo da revista Wired:

Photo: Courtesy Sigurdur Thordarson

Photo: Courtesy Sigurdur Thordarson

“On an August workday in 2011, a cherubic 18-year-old Icelandic man named Sigurdur “Siggi” Thordarson walked through the stately doors of the U.S. embassy in Reykjavík, his jacket pocket concealing his calling card: a crumpled photocopy of an Australian passport. The passport photo showed a man with a unruly shock of platinum blonde hair and the name Julian Paul Assange.

Thordarson was long time volunteer for WikiLeaks with direct access to Assange and a key position as an organizer in the group. With his cold war-style embassy walk-in, he became something else: the first known FBI informant inside WikiLeaks. For the next three months, Thordarson served two masters, working for the secret-spilling website and simultaneously spilling its secrets to the U.S. government in exchange, he says, for a total of about $5,000. The FBI flew him internationally four times for debriefings, including one trip to Washington D.C., and on the last meeting obtained from Thordarson eight hard drives packed with chat logs, video and other data from WikiLeaks.

The relationship provides a rare window into the U.S. law enforcement investigation into WikiLeaks, the transparency group newly thrust back into international prominence with its assistance to NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. Thordarson’s double-life illustrates the lengths to which the government was willing to go in its pursuit of Julian Assange, approaching WikiLeaks with the tactics honed during the FBI’s work against organized crime and computer hacking — or, more darkly, the bureau’s Hoover-era infiltration of civil rights groups.

“It’s a sign that the FBI views WikiLeaks as a suspected criminal organization rather than a news organization,” says Stephen Aftergood of the Federation of American Scientists’ Project on Government Secrecy. “WikiLeaks was something new, so I think the FBI had to make a choice at some point as to how to evaluate it: Is this The New York Times, or is this something else? And they clearly decided it was something else.”

The FBI declined comment.

Thordarson was 17 years old and still in high school when he joined WikiLeaks in February 2010. He was one of a large contingent of Icelandic volunteers that flocked to Assange’s cause after WikiLeaks published internal bank documents pertaining to that country’s financial crisis.

When a staff revolt in September 2010 left the organization short-handed, Assange put Thordarson in charge of the WikiLeaks chat room, making Thordarson the first point of contact for new volunteers, journalists, potential sources, and outside groups clamoring to get in with WikiLeaks at the peak of its notoriety.

In that role, Thordarson was a middle man in the negotiations with the Bradley Manning Defense Fund that led to WikiLeaks donating $15,000 to the defense of its prime source. He greeted and handled a new volunteer who had begun downloading and organizing a vast trove of 1970s-era diplomatic cables from the National Archives and Record Administration, for what became WikiLeaks’ “Kissinger cables” collection last April. And he wrangled scores of volunteers and supporters who did everything from redesign WikiLeaks’ websites to shooting video homages to Assange.

He accumulated thousands of pages of chat logs from his time in WikiLeaks, which, he says, are now in the hands of the FBI.

Thordarson’s betrayal of WikiLeaks also was a personal betrayal of its founder, Julian Assange, who, former colleagues say, took Thordarson under his wing, and kept him around in the face of criticism and legal controversy.

“When Julian met him for the first or second time, I was there,” says Birgitta Jonsdottir, a member of Icelandic Parliament who worked with WikiLeaks on Collateral Murder, the Wikileaks release of footage of a US helicopter attack in Iraq. “And I warned Julian from day one, there’s something not right about this guy… I asked not to have him as part of the Collateral Murder team.”

In January 2011, Thordarson was implicated in a bizarre political scandal in which a mysterious “spy computer” laptop was found running unattended in an empty office in the parliament building. “If you did [it], don’t tell me,” Assange told Thordarson, according to unauthenticated chat logs provided by Thordarson.

“I will defend you against all accusations, ring [sic] and wrong, and stick by you, as I have done,” Assange told him in another chat the next month. “But I expect total loyalty in return.”

Instead, Thordarson used his proximity to Assange for his own purposes. The most consequential act came in June 2011, on his third visit to Ellingham Hall — the English mansion where Assange was then under house arrest while fighting extradition to Sweden.

For reasons that remain murky, Thordarson decided to approach members of the Lulzsec hacking gang and solicit them to hack Islandic government systems as a service to WikiLeaks. To establish his bona fides as a WikiLeaks representative, he shot and uploaded a 40-second cell phone video that opens on the IRC screen with the chat in progress, and then floats across the room to capture Asssange at work with an associate. (This exchange was first reported by Parmy Olson in her book on Anonymous).

Unfortunately for Thordarson, the FBI had busted Lulzsec’s leader, Hector Xavier Monsegur, AKA Sabu, a week earlier, and secured his cooperation as an informant. On June 20, the FBI warned the Icelandic government. “A huge team of FBI came to Iceland and asked the Icelandic authorities to help them,” says Jonsdottir. “They thought there was an imminent Lulzsec attack on Iceland.”

The FBI may not have known at this point who Thordarson was beyond his screen names. The bureau and law enforcement agencies in the UK and Australia went on to round up alleged Lulzsec members on unrelated charges.

Having dodged that bullet, it’s not clear what prompted Thordarson to approach the FBI two months later. When I asked him directly last week, he answered, “I guess I cooperated because I didn’t want to participate in having Anonymous and Lulzsec hack for Wikileaks, since then you’re definitely breaking quite a lot of laws.”

That answer doesn’t make a lot of sense, since it was Thordarson, not Assange, who asked Lulzsec to hack Iceland. There’s no evidence of any other WikiLeaks staffer being involved. He offered a second reason that he admits is more truthful: “The second reason was the adventure.”

Thordarson’s equivocation highlights a hurdle in reporting on him: He is prone to lying. Jonsdottir calls him “pathological.” He admits he has lied to me in the past. For this story, Thordarson backed his account by providing emails that appear to be between him and his FBI handlers, flight records for some of his travels, and an FBI receipt indicating that he gave them eight hard drives. The Icelandic Ministry of the Interior has previously confirmed that the FBI flew to Iceland to interview Thordarson. Thordarson also testified to much of this account in a session of the Icelandic Parliament, with Jonsdottir in attendance.

Finally, he has given me a substantial subset of the chat logs he says he passed to the FBI, amounting to about 2,000 pages, which, at the very least, proves that he kept logs and is willing to turn them over to a reporter disliked by Julian Assange.

Thordarson’s “adventure” began on August 23, 2011, when he sent an email to the general delivery box for the U.S. embassy in Reykjavík “Regarding an Ongoing Criminal investigation in the United States.”

“The nature of the intel that can be brought to light in that investigation will not be spoken over email conversation,” he wrote cryptically.

An embassy security officer called him the same day. “He said, ‘What investigation?’ I said the Wikileaks,” says Thordarson. “He denied there was such an investigation, so I just said we both know there is.”

Thordarson was invited to the embassy, where he presented a copy of Assange’s passport, the passport for Assange’s number two, Kristinn Hrafnsson, and a snippet of a private chat between Thordarson and Assange. The embassy official was noncommittal. He told Thordarson they might be in touch, but it would take at least a week.

It happened much faster.

Photo: Courtesy Sigurdur Thordarson

FBI agents and two federal prosecutors landed in a private Gulfstream on the next day, on August 24, and Thordarson was summoned back to the embassy.

He was met by the same embassy official who took his keys and his cell phone, then walked with him on a circuitous route through the streets of downtown Reykjavík, ending up at the Hotel Reykjavik Centrum, Thordarson says. There, Thordarson spent two hours in a hotel conference room talking to two FBI agents. Then they accompanied back to the embassy so he could put money in his parking meter, and back to the hotel for more debriefing.

The agents asked him about his Lulzsec interactions, but were primarily interested in what he could give them on WikiLeaks. One of them asked him if he could wear a recording device on his next visit to London and get Assange to say something incriminating, or talk about Bradley Manning.

“They asked what I use daily, have always on,” he says. “I said, my watch. So they said they could change that out for some recording watch.”

Thordarson says he declined. “I like Assange, even considered him a friend,” he says. “I just didn’t want to go that way.”

In all, Thordarson spent 20 hours with the agents over about five days. Then the Icelandic government ordered the FBI to pack up and go home.

It turns out the FBI had misled the local authorities about its purpose in the country. According to atimeline (.pdf) later released by the National Commissioner of the Icelandic Police, the FBI contacted Icelandic law enforcement to report Thordarson’s embassy walk-in, and ask for permission to fly into the country to follow up. But the bureau had presented the request as an extension of its earlier investigation into Lulzsec, and failed to mention that its real target was WikiLeaks.

WikiLeaks is well regarded in Iceland, and the incident errupted into a hot political topic when it surfaced there this year, with conservatives arguing that Iceland should have cooperated with the FBI, and liberals complaining about the agents being allowed into the country to begin with. “It became a massive controversy,” says Jonsdottir. “And then none of them knew what sort of person Siggi is.”

Politics aside, the FBI was not done with Thordarson.

The agents persuaded Thordarson to fly to Copenhagen with them, he says, for another day of interviews. In October, he made a second trip to Denmark for another debriefing. Between meetings, Thordarson kept in touch with his handlers through disposable email accounts.

In November 2011, Thordarson was fired from WikiLeaks. The organization had discovered he had set up an online WikiLeaks tee shirt store and arranged for the proceeds to go into his own bank account. WikiLeaks has said the embezzlement amounted to about $50,000.

Thordarson told the FBI about it in a terse email on November 8. “No longer with WikiLeaks — so not sure how I can help you more.”

“We’d still like to talk with you in person,” one of his handlers replied. “I can think of a couple of easy ways for you to help.”

“Can you guys help me with cash?” Thordarson shot back.

Image: Courtesy Sigurdur Thordarson

For the next few months, Thordarson begged the FBI for money, while the FBI alternately ignored him and courted him for more assistance. In the end, Thordarson says, the FBI agreed to compensate him for the work he missed while meeting with agents (he says he worked at a bodyguard-training school), totaling about $5,000.

With the money settled, the FBI began preparing him for a trip to the U.S. “I wanted to talk to you about future things we can do,” his handler wrote in February. The FBI wanted him to reestablish contact with some of his former WikiLeaks associates. “We’ll talk about specific goals of the chats, but you can get a head start before our meet by just getting in touch and catching up with them. If you need to know who specifically, we can discuss on the phone.”

The three-day D.C. trip took place in February of last year. Thordarson says he flew on Iceland Air flight 631 to Logan International Airport on February 22, and transferred in Boston to JetBlue flight 686 to Dulles International Aiport, where he was greeted by a U.S. Customs official “and then escorted out the Dulles terminal into the arms of the FBI.”

He stayed at a hotel in Arlington, Virginia, where the Justice Department’s investigation into WikiLeaks is centered, and met there with his two usual FBI contacts, and three or four other men in suits who did not identify themselves.

“At the last day we went to a steak house and ate, all of us,” he says. “Where they served Coca Cola in glass bottles from Mexico.”

On March 18, 2012, he had one more meeting with the FBI in Denmark. On this trip, he brought along eight of his personal hard drives, containing the information he’d compiled while at WikiLeaks, including his chat logs, photos and videos he shot at Ellington Hall. The FBI gave him a signed receipt for the hardware.

Then they cut him off.

Today, Thordarson, now 20, has new problems. He’s facing criminal charges in Iceland for unrelated financial and tax crimes. In addition, WikiLeaks filed a police report for the tee-shirt shop embezzlement.

The legacy of his cooperation with the FBI is unclear. A court filing revealed last week shows that in the months following Thordarson ’s last debriefing, Justice Department officials in Arlington, Virginia, began obtaining court orders targeting two of Thordarson ’s former WikiLeaks colleagues in Iceland: Smari McCarthy and Herbert Snorrason.

Snorrason, who ran the WikiLeaks chat room in 2010, before Thordarson took it over, had the entire contents of his Gmail account handed over to the government, under a secret search warrant issued in October 2011.

The evidence used to obtain the warrant remains under seal. “I do wonder,” says Thordarson, “whether I’m somewhere in there.”

A história esquecida do soldado Bradley Manning

Julian Assange continua refugiado na embaixada do Equador, em Londres. O Wikileaks continua a funcionar. Mas aquele que permitiu à organização fundada por Julian Assange tornar-se um actor global – a sua grande fonte inicial – foi preso e irá ser julgado num tribunal marcial. A reportagem do jornalista Quentin McDermott sobre Bradley Manning, para o programa Four Corners,da ABC australiana, conta a sua história. Chama-se The Forgotten Man.

Wikileaks divulga política externa de Henry Kissinger

Desde que, em Junho do ano passado, se refugiu na embaixada do Equador, em Londres, para impedir a extradição para a Suécia, onde é procurado por violação, Julian Assange, tem tido um problema: demasiado tempo livre. Desde então, o fundador do Wikileaks realizou uma série de 10 entrevistas intituladas O Mundo Amanhã (emitidas em exclusivo por O Informador em Portugal) e trabalhou num dos maiores projectos da organização: a Public Library of US Diplomacy (PlusD).
Divulgada hoje, a PlusD tem a maior base de dados de comunicações diplomáticas dos Estados Unidos do mundo. Ao todo são mais de dois milhões de documentos com cerca de mil milhões de palavras. A maioria (1.7 milhões) são os chamados Kissinger Cables, documentos que abrangem o período entre 1973 e 1976 e que incluem inúmeros telegramas diplomáticos enviados ao antigo secretário de Estado Henry Kissinger. Ao todo, são mais de 380 gigabytes de informação organizados numa única base de dados que dão ao público em geral um acesso único a documentos disponíveis apenas nos National Archives dos Estados Unidos. Para já, a organização promete revelações sobre ao relacionamento norte-americano com as ditaduras fascistas da América Latina e sobre o regime de Franco, em Espanha.

Como se calcula, há também muita informação sobre Portugal e os protagonistas da conturbada vida política portuguesa naqueles anos.

m180x120mm_EU_web

A história de Julian Assange e da Wikileaks

Em 2008, Alex Gibney venceu o Oscar de melhor documentário com Taxi to the Dark Side. Anteriormente já tinha sido nomeado com Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room. Agora regressa com uma nova obra que promete levá-lo de novo à lista de nomeados da Academia: We Steal Secrets: The Story of WikiLeaks.
Mesmo sem ter entrevistado Julian Assange, Alex Gibney conta como um pequeno grupo de pessoas conseguiu expor os segredos de instituições tão poderosas como o exército norte-americano, o departamento de Estado dos Estados Unidos e das firmas Stratfor e Enron. Faz novas revelações sobre Bradley Manning, o militar que terá passado milhares de documentos a Assange. Retrata a administração de Barack Obama como um grupo de pessoas mais interessadas em esconder informação do que em procurar justiça. E, mais do que isso, o documentário é ainda um intenso debate sobre a liberdade e o acesso à informação – que, graças a Wikileaks, mudou de forma permanente. Para já, está disponível o trailer.

O fim de “O Mundo Amanhã”

Hoje, no 12º e último episódio desta série, Julian Assange entrevista Anwar Ibrahim, o mais proeminente e provocador líder da oposição na Malásia. O Mundo Amanhã é uma produção do WikiLeaks em colaboração com o canal Russia Today. Estas entrevistas são transmitidas por O Informador em parceria com a Agência Pública.

assange_lastshow-600x380

Por Agência Pública

Em busca de ideias poderosas que podem transformar o mundo, o fundador do WikiLeaks depara-se com um caso semelhante ao seu trajecto de vida.

Depois de ter sido Vice Primeiro-Ministro da Malásia na década de 1990, Anwar Ibrahim foi expulso da política e preso por acusações de corrupção e crimes sexuais – no caso, sodomia, considerada ilegal no país asiático. Após seis anos de cativeiro, foi absolvido das acusações. Mas, em 2008, teve que enfrentar novas acusações por crimes sexuais e enfrentar uma batalha legal de quatro anos. Só foi absolvido em Janeiro de 2012.

Para ele, a Malásia é ainda menos democrática do que a vizinha Birmânia. Anwar Ibrahim descreve democracia como tendo “um poder judicial independente, uma imprensa livre e uma política económica que pode promover crescimento e a economia de mercado”. Com essa plataforma, o seu partido está ganhar o apoio da população e é uma  ameaça ao actual governo nas próximas eleições gerais de 2013.

Agora, Ibrahim foi acusado participar numa manifestação em defesa de reformas eleitorais – reuniões não autorizadas também são consideradas crime – o que pode comprometer suas ambições eleitorais. Mas, durante a entrevista, ele mostra-se optimista quando relembra a última campanha, em 2008. “Ganhámos 10 dos 11 mandatos parlamentares. Acredito que estamos maduros para um tipo de Primavera Malaia através do processo eleitoral”, diz.

Veja a entrevista a seguir, ou clique aqui para fazer o download do texto na íntegra.

O Mundo Amanhã

Devido a um problema técnico a que O Informador é alheio, o link para o vídeo da última entrevista de Julian Assange para o projecto O Mundo Amanhã ainda não está disponível. Assim que o problema for resolvido, o texto e o vídeo serão colocados online. Para já, fica aqui o pedido de desculpas.

O Mundo Amanhã: a última entrevista de Julian Assange

Amanhã, dia 19 de Dezembro, O Informador, em parceria com a Agência Pública, transmite em exclusivo em Portugal a última das 12 entrevistas feitas por Julian Assange para o projecto O Mundo Amanhã. Esta semana, o fundador do WikiLeaks - que realizou este projecto em parceria com o canal Russia Today – entrevista o líder carismático da oposição malaia Dato’ Seri Anwar bin Ibrahim. O episódio será colocado online às 20h. Todas as outras entrevistas – incluindo ao intelectual Noam Chomsky e ao presidente do Equador Rafael Correa – podem ser encontradas através da etiqueta O Mundo Amanhã.

anwar-ibrahim1-oct10

Anwar bin Iberahim já foi um alto responsável do governo do primeiro-ministro Mahathir bin Mohamad. No final dos anos 1990 caiu em desgraça e foi expulso da vida política acusado de corrupção e sodomia que se revelaram politicamente motivadas. Quando foi ilibado já tinha cumprido seis anos de prisão. Em 2008 voltou à política, recolheu grande apoio numa plataforma anti-corrupção e foi novamente alvo de acusações de sodomia. Mais uma vez, garantiu que eram  boatos lançados pelos adversários. Ainda assim travou uma batalha judicial contra as acusações e em Janeiro deste ano foi absolvido de todas as acusações.

Em Maio de 2012 – já depois de esta entrevista ser filmada – Anwar foi acusado de apelar ao boicote à lei anti-protestos, devido à sua participação numa marcha pró-democracia. Se for condenado, será novamente afastado da política e impedido de concorrer às próximas eleições legislativas.

Noam Chomsky e Tariq Ali debatem o futuro do planeta

Hoje, no décimo primeiro episódio desta série, Julian Assange entrevista o intelectual norte-americano Noam Chomsky e o historiador paquistanês, Tariq Ali. Os três conversam sobre as recentes mudanças políticas no planeta e analisam a direcção em que estamos a caminhar. O Mundo Amanhã é uma produção do WikiLeaks em colaboração com o canal Russia Today. Estas entrevistas são transmitidas por O Informador em parceria com a Agência Pública.

tariq-chomsky-julian

Por Agência Pública

Ninguém poderia tê-las previsto. Mas ainda com o mundo sob o efeito das revoluções no Médio Oriente, Julian Assange reuniu-se com dois pensadores de peso para saber o que eles pensam sobre o futuro.

Noam Chomsky, conceituado linguista e pensador, e Tariq Ali, romancista de revoluções e historiador militar, encontram na Primavera Árabe questões sobre a independência das nações, a crise da democracia, sistemas políticos eficientes (ou não) e a legião de jovens activistas que se tem levantado em protesto por todo o mundo. ”A democracia é como uma concha vazia, e é isso que está a revoltar a juventude. Ela sente que, faça o que fizer, vote em quem votar, nada vai mudar. Daí todos esses protestos”, explica Ali.

“O que temos na política ocidental não é extrema esquerda nem extrema direita. É um extremo centro”, continua. “E esse extremo centro engloba tanto o centro-direita como o centro-esquerda, que concordam em vários fundamentos: travar guerras no exterior, ocupar países e punir os pobres, através de medidas de austeridade. Não importa qual o partido no poder, seja nos Estados Unidos ou no mundo ocidental…”

Segundo o próprio Tariq Ali, a grande crise da democracia está nas mãos das corporações. “Quando você tem dois países europeus, como a Grécia e a Itália, e os políticos a abdicar e a dizer ‘deixem os banqueiros comandar’… Para onde isso está a ir? Nós estamos a testemunhar a democracia a tornar-se cada vez mais despida de conteúdo”, critica o activista.

Mas após as revoluções, as conquistas vêm da construção de novos modelos políticos. Noam Chomsky cita a Bolívia como exemplo. “Eu não acho que as potências populares preocupadas em mudar suas próprias sociedades deveriam procurar modelos. Deveriam criar os modelos”. Para ele, a chegada da população indígena ao poder político através da figura de Evo Morales está a repetir-se no Equador e no Peru. “É melhor o Ocidente captar rápido alguns aspectos desses modelos, ou então ele vai acabar”, alerta Chomsky.

Por outro lado, segundo Tariq Ali, está na mãos dos jovens perceber a necessidade de agir. “Não desistam. Tenham esperança. Permaneçam cépticos. Sejam críticos com o sistema que nos tem dominado. E mais cedo ou mais tarde, se não for essa geração, então nas próximas, as coisas vão mudar”.

Veja a entrevista a seguir, ou clique aqui para fazer o download do texto na íntegra.

Assange entrevista Noam Chomsky e Tariq Ali

Amanhã, dia 12 de Dezembro, O Informador, em parceria com a Agência Pública, transmite em exclusivo em Portugal a décima primeira das 12 entrevistas conduzidas por Julian Assange para o projecto O Mundo Amanhã. Esta semana, o fundador do WikiLeaks - que realizou este projecto em parceria com o canal Russia Today – entrevista o intelectual norte-americano Noam Chomsky e o historiador paquistanês Tariq Ali. O episódio será colocado online às 20h.

noam

Noam Chomsky é um linguista e intelectual de renome mundial. Como o pai da teoria da “gramática degenerativa”, desempenhou um papel central na revolução cognitiva da filosofia, linguística, matemática e psicologia. Desde a década de 1960 que é um dos mais consistentes críticos da política externa norte-americana. Opôs-se à guerra do Vietname e, juntamente com Howard Zinn, fez parte do grupo de Boston que foi alvo de investigações após a divulgação dos “Pentagon Papers”. Desde então que produziu uma enorme quantidade de obras que lhe garantiram a reputação de mais reputada voz dissidente do “estalishment” intelectual dos Estados Unidos.

Tariq

Tariq Ali é um historiador militar e intelectual paquistanês. Nos anos 1960, ganhou a reputação de homem de rua pelas suas acções como activista político nos protestos contra a Guerra do Vietname no Reino Unido. Ao longo dos anos manteve-se como um esquerdista e comentador anti-guerra. Hoje continua a ser um forte crítico do imperialismo e das reformas neoliberais ocidentais, e baseia a sua argumentação nos acontecimentos históricos do último século. Num trabalho recente, focou-se nas políticas de continuidade entre as administrações Bush e Obama: argumenta que a guerra ao terrorismo continua a ser um pretexto para a cada vez maior impunidade na conduta internacional dos Estados Unidos e dos seus aliados.

O Mundo Amanhã: A guerra não declarada no Paquistão

Hoje, no décimo episódio desta série, Julian Assange entrevista Imran Khan, candidato à presidência do Paquistão, para discutir o futuro de um dos países mais afectados pela Guerra ao Terrorismo. O Mundo Amanhã é uma produção do WikiLeaks em colaboração com o canal Russia Today. Estas entrevistas são transmitidas por O Informador em parceria com a Agência Pública.

Ep10-2-600x380

Por Agência Pública

Ao longo de 25 minutos Julian Assange recebe Imran Khan, que nos anos 70 e 80 foi capitão da vitoriosa equipa de críquete do Paquistão, para conversar sobre corrupção, Osama Bin Laden, soberania e bombas atómicas. Isso porque Khan está na corrida para se tornar o próximo presidente do país nas eleições de 2013, liderando a oposição com o partido que criou, o Movimento para Justiça, que combate a corrupção no país.

O Paquistão tem uma dívida acumulada de 12 trilhões de rúpias. “Metade do nosso PIB vai para o pagamento de dívidas, 600 bilhões vão para o exército e assim 180 milhões de pessoas têm 200 bilhões de rúpias para sobreviver. Então, claramente, o país está inviabilizado”, diz o político. A crise é sentida na pele pela população: em áreas urbanas, não há eletricidade até 15 horas por dia e os apagões chegam a durar 18 horas nas áreas rurais.

Khan tornou-se a principal voz crítica ao fazer denúncias sobre o governo do Paquistão, um dos países mais afetados pela Guerra ao Terrorismo promovida pelos EUA. “40 mil paquistaneses foram mortos numa guerra com a qual não temos nada a ver. Basicamente, nosso próprio exército mata o nosso povo e eles fazem ataques suicidas a civis paquistaneses. O país já perdeu 70 bilhões de dólares nessa guerra. A ajuda humanitária total tem sido de menos de US$ 20 bilhões”, diz Khan.

Mas como Khan levaria a relação com os Estados Unidos caso fosse eleito? “Não deveria ser uma relação de cliente-patrão, e pior ainda, o Paquistão como pistoleiro contratado, sendo pago para matar inimigos da América. Nós somos um Estado independente e soberano e a relação com os EUA deve ser de dignidade e respeito mútuo, não mais uma relação de cliente-patrão”, diz. Resta saber se, caso vença, cumprirá suas palavras.

Assista a entrevista a seguir, ou clique aqui para fazer o download do texto na íntegra.

Assange entrevista antigo campeão de cricket paquistanês

Amanhã, dia 5 de Dezembro, O Informador, em parceria com a Agência Pública, transmite em exclusivo em Portugal a décima das 12 entrevistas conduzidas por Julian Assange para o projecto O Mundo Amanhã. Esta semana, o fundador do WikiLeaks - que realizou este projecto em parceria com o canal Russia Today – entrevista o actual líder político paquistanês, Imran Khan. O episódio será colocado online às 20h.

Imran-Khan-in-The-Julian-Assange-Show

Em tempos, o partido Tehreek-e-Insaf, foi escrito nos telegramas diplomáticos norte-americanos como uma formação de um homem só. No entanto, as críticas persistentes de Imran Khan começaram a ganhar apoio junto da população. Desde o final de 2011 que o antigo campeão de cricket tem levado dezenas de milhares de manifestantes para as ruas em protesto contra a corrupção e a subserviência em relação aos interesses dos Estados Unidos. Ele promete afastar o Paquistão das lideranças dinásticas dos partidos políticos tradicionais e restaurar a independência do poder judicial. Hoje em dia o partido de Imran Khan é visto como um forte concorrente nas próximas eleições, que poderão ser marcadas no próximo ano.

O Mundo Amanhã: A Guerra Virtual, parte 2

Hoje, no nono episódio desta série, Julian Assange continua a entrevista aos seus companheiros de armas, os criptopunks, virtuosos cyberativistas que lutam pela paz na internet. Hoje o debate é sobre a arquitetura da web, a liberdade de expressão e as consequências da luta por novas políticas na internet. O Mundo Amanhã é uma produção do WikiLeaks em colaboração com o canal Russia Today. Estas entrevistas são transmitidas por O Informador em parceria com a Agência Pública.

Por Agência Pública

O nono episódio da série O Mundo Amanhã continua com os activistas da liberdade de informação na internet, Jacob Appelbaum, Andy Müller-Maguhn, Jeremie Zimmerman e, claro, Julian Assange, no papel de advogado do diabo. “Trole-nos, mestre troll”, brinca Jacob.

Na luta pela liberdade na web, os Criptopunks lançam algumas luzes sobre a guerra virtual entre a partilha livre e o roubo, o poder dos governos em intervir versus a liberdade de expressão – e as consequências dessa batalha.

“A arquitetura é a verdade. E isso vale para a internet em relação às comunicações. Os chamados ‘sistemas legais de intercepção’, que são só uma forma branda de dizer ‘espiar pessoas’. Certo?”, diz Jacob. “Você apenas coloca “legal” após qualquer coisa porque quem está fazendo é o Estado. Mas na verdade é a arquitetura do Estado que o permite fazer isso, no fim das contas. É a arquitetura das leis e a arquitetura da tecnologia assim como a arquitetura dos sistemas financeiros”.

O debate segue apoiado nas possíveis perspectivas para o futuro. Para os Criptopunks, as políticas devem se pautar na sociedade e nas mudanças que seguem com ela, não o contrário.

“Temos a impressão, com a batalha dos direitos autorais, de que os legisladores tentam fazer com que toda a sociedade mude para se adaptar ao esquema que é definido por Hollywood. Esta não é a forma de se fazer boas políticas. Uma boa política observa o mundo e se adapta a ele, de modo a corrigir o que é errado e permitir o que é bom”, diz Jeremie.

Mas a busca por novas políticas e uma nova arquitetura tem seu preço. Jacob, detido várias vezes em aeroportos americanos, conta: “Eles disseram que eu sei por que isso ocorre. Depende de quando, eles sempre me dão respostas diferentes. Mas geralmente dão uma resposta, que é a mesma em todas instâncias: ‘porque nós podemos’”.

E provoca: “A censura e vigilância não são problemas de ‘outros lugares’. As pessoas no Ocidente adoram falar sobre como iranianos e chineses e norte-coreanos precisam de anonimato, de liberdade, de todas essas coisas, mas nós não as temos aqui”.

Assista a entrevista a seguir, ou clique aqui para fazer o download do texto na íntegra.

O Mundo Amanhã: Assange entrevista ciberactivistas (parte dois)

Amanhã, dia 28 de Novembro, O Informador, em parceria com a Agência Pública, transmite em exclusivo em Portugal a nona das 12 entrevistas conduzidas por Julian Assange para o projecto O Mundo Amanhã. Esta semana, o fundador do WikiLeaks - que realizou este projecto em parceria com o canal Russia Today – continua a entrevista aos ciberactivistas Jacob Applebaum, Andy Mueller-Maguhn e Jeremie Zimmermann. O episódio será colocado online às 20h. A primeira parte pode ser vista aqui.

Jacob Applebaunn é investigador da Universidade de Washington e membro do Projecto Tor, um sistema de anonimato online disponível a todos que luta contra a cibervigilância e a censura na internet. Jacob acredita que todos temos o direito a ler sem restrições e a falar livremente. Em 2010, quando Julian Assange não pôde dar uma palestra em Nova Iorque, Jacob assumiu o seu lugar. Desde então que tem sido perseguido pelo governo americano: já foi interrogado em aeroportos, sujeito a revistas intimas enquanto era ameaçado de violação na prisão por agentes da autoridade, viu o seu equipamento ser confiscado e o seu site ser pronunciado pela justiça. Ainda assim, mantém-se um apoiante do Wikileaks.

Andy Mueller-Maguhn é um membro e antigo porta-voz do grupo alemão Chaos Computer Club. É especialista em vigilância e está a trabalhar num projecto na wikipédia para dotar o jornalismo de capacidade de vigilância da indústria, o buggedplanet.info. Trabalha em comunicações criptografadas e gere uma empresa chamada Cryptophone, que fornece telecomunicações seguras.

Jeremie Zimmermann é fundador e porta-voz do grupo La Quadrature du Net, a mais proeminente organização europeia de defesa do direito ao anonimato na internet. Trabalha na construção de ferramentas para que o público possa usar em debates abertos. Está também envolvido nas guerras dos direitos de autor, no debate sobre a neutralidade da internet e outros assuntos cruciais para o futuro da web livre. Pouco depois desta entrevista foi detido por dois agentes do FBI quando estava a deixar os Estados Unidos e interrogado sobre Julian Assange e o Wikileaks.

O Mundo Amanhã: a guerra virtual

Hoje, no oitavo episódio desta série, Julian Assange entrevista os companheiros de armas, os criptopunks, virtuosos cyberativistas que lutam pela paz na internet. E avisam: não haverá paz sem liberdade. O Mundo Amanhã é uma produção do WikiLeaks em colaboração com o canal Russia Today. Estas entrevistas são transmitidas por O Informador em parceria com a Agência Pública

20121121-200426.jpg

Por Agência Pública

“Uma guerra invisível e frenética pelo futuro da sociedade está em andamento. De um lado, uma rede de governos e corporações vasculham tudo o que fazemos. Do outro lado, os Criptopunks, desenvolvedores que também moldam políticas públicas dedicadas a manter a privacidade de seus dados pessoais na web. É esse o movimento que gerou o WikiLeaks”, diz Julian Assange, na introdução da oitava entrevista da série World Tomorrow.

Dividida em duas partes, a entrevista traz Assange reunido com seus companheiros Andy Muller Maguhn, Jeremie Zimmerman e Jacob Appelbaum, cyberativistas que lutam pela liberdade na internet.

“É só olhar o Google. O Google sabe, se você é um usuário padrão do Google, o Google sabe com quem você se comunica, quem você conhece, do que você pesquisa, potencialmente sua orientação sexual, sua religião e pensamento filosófico mais que sua mãe e talvez mais que você mesmo”, fala Jeremie.

No bate-papo, eles conversam sobre os desafios técnicos colocados pelo furto do governo a dados pessoais, a importância do ativismo na web e a democratização da tecnologia de criptografia.

“A força da autoridade é derivada da violência. As pessoas deveriam conhecer criptografia. Nenhuma quantidade de violência resolverá um problema matemático. E esta é a chave-mestra. Não significa que você não pode ser torturado, não significa que eles não podem tentar grampear sua casa ou te sabotar de alguma forma, mas se eles acharem alguma mensagem criptografada, não importa se eles têm força de autoridade. Por trás de tudo que eles fazem, eles não podem resolver um problema matemático”, sentencia Jacob.

Na entrevista, os criptopunks avisam: para se ter paz na internet, é preciso haver liberdade. Ou a guerra vai continuar.

Assista a entrevista a seguir, ou clique aqui para baixar o texto na íntegra.

O Mundo Amanhã: Assange entrevista ciberactivistas

Amanhã, dia 21 de Novembro, O Informador, em parceria com a Agência Pública, transmite em exclusivo em Portugal a oitava das 12 entrevistas conduzidas por Julian Assange para o projecto O Mundo Amanhã. Esta semana, o fundador do WikiLeaks - que realizou este projecto em parceria com o canal Russia Today – entrevista os ciberactivistas Jacob Applebaum, Andy Mueller-Maguhn e Jeremie Zimmermann. A primeira parte deste episódio será colocada online às 20h. A segunda parte estará disponível no dia 28 de Novembro.

Jacob Applebaunn é investigador da Universidade de Washington e membro do Projecto Tor, um sistema de anonimato online disponível a todos que luta contra a cibervigilância e a censura na internet. Jacob acredita que todos temos o direito a ler sem restrições e a falar livremente. Em 2010, quando Julian Assange não pôde dar uma palestra em Nova Iorque, Jacob assumiu o seu lugar. Desde então que tem sido perseguido pelo governo americano: já foi interrogado em aeroportos, sujeito a revistas intimas enquanto era ameaçado de violação na prisão por agentes da autoridade, viu o seu equipamento ser confiscado e o seu site ser pronunciado pela justiça. Ainda assim, mantém-se um apoiante do Wikileaks.

Andy Mueller-Maguhn é um membro e antigo porta-voz do grupo alemão Chaos Computer Club. É especialista em vigilância e está a trabalhar num projecto na wikipédia para dotar o jornalismo de capacidade de vigilância da indústria, o buggedplanet.info. Trabalha em comunicações criptografadas e gere uma empresa chamada Cryptophone, que fornece telecomunicações seguras.

Jeremie Zimmermann é fundador e porta-voz do grupo La Quadrature du Net, a mais proeminente organização europeia de defesa do direito ao anonimato na internet. Trabalha na construção de ferramentas para que o público possa usar em debates abertos. Está também envolvido nas guerras dos direitos de autor, no debate sobre a neutralidade da internet e outros assuntos cruciais para o futuro da web livre. Pouco depois desta entrevista foi detido por dois agentes do FBI quando estava a deixar os Estados Unidos e interrogado sobre Julian Assange e o Wikileaks.

O Mundo Amanhã: Ocupar as Ruas

Hoje, no sétimo episódio desta série, Julian Assange entrevista os líderes do movimento Occupy de Londres e Nova Iorque, Alexa O’Brien, David Graeber, Naomi Colvin, Aaron Peters e Marisa Holmes. A transmissão deste episódio resulta de uma parceria de O Informador com a Agência Pública. O Mundo Amanhã é uma produção do WikiLeaks em colaboração com o canal Russia Today. Em dia de greve geral e confrontos nas ruas de Lisboa, esta entrevista torna-se especialmente actual.

Por Agência Pública

Em busca de ideias que podem mudar o mundo, Julian Assange convocou alguns ativistas dos movimentos Occupy de Londres e Nova York para conversar sobre estratégias de mobilização, protestos que utilizam práticas de não-violência e o caso específico do Occupy, suas origens e rumos.

Em meados de 2011, uma  organização canadense fez o seguinte desafio aos norte-americanos “Ocupem Wall Street em 17 de setembro. Tragam suas barracas”. Inspirados por movimentos como a Primavera Árabe e o 15M espanhol, centenas de pessoas ocuparam, num primeiro momento, uma praça no coração financeiro do EUA, em Wall Street. A Zucotti Park foi rebatizada de “Liberty Square”.

Auto-intitulado como um movimento de resistência sem líderes, o Occupy Wall Street (OWS)  adotou e dependeu das ferramentas de comunicação online para coordenar suas ações. A intenção original do OWS, assim como do 15M, era diferente da Primavera Árabe: o que se propunha, inicialmente, era uma reflexão profunda sobre o sistema econômico e político. “Nós não só temos uma crise financeira global, mas temos uma crise política global porque nossas instituições não funcionam mais”, defende um dos participantes.

Sua principal estratégia foram as assembleias gerais para tomar decisões – nomes como Slavoj Zizek e Noam Chomsky participaram delas. Há quem acredite foi justamente isso que gerou uma violenta repressão policial em todo o mundo, quando o movimento se esaplhou para mais de cem cidades.  ”Acho que por estar lá e exercer de forma direta o processo democrático, representávamos uma ameaça e a polícia teve que responder”, diz, na entrevista, um dos participantes do Occupy de Nova York.

Um ano depois, a pergunta segue sendo essencial: e agora?

Assista a entrevista a seguir, ou clique aqui para fazer o download do texto na íntegra.

Assange entrevista líderes do movimento Occupy

Amanhã, dia 14 de Novembro, O Informador, em parceria com a Agência Pública, transmite em exclusivo em Portugal a sétima das 12 entrevistas conduzidas por Julian Assange para o projecto O Mundo Amanhã. Esta semana, o fundador do WikiLeaks - que realizou este projecto em parceria com o canal Russia Today – entrevista os líderes do movimento Occupy, Alexa O’Brien, David Graeber, Naomi Colvin, Aaron Peters e Marisa Holmes. O episódio será colocada online às 20h.

Alexa O’Brien  é uma jornalista e activista nova iorquina. Em 2011 iniciou a campanha #USDayofRage que pedia a reforma do sistema eleitoral. Através do seu website tem feito a cobertura do julgamento de Bradley Manning.

David Graeber é um antropólogo Americano baseado em Londres. É autor de Debt: The First Five Thousand Years, uma monografia sobre o papel da dívida nas revoluções e movimentos históricos. Foi um dos primeiros participantes nas manifestações Occupy Wall Street.

Naomi Colvin está por detrás do grupo UK Friends of Bradley Manning. Tem sido também uma porta-voz do grupo Occupy London.

Aaron Peters é doutorando na Universidade de Londres. Tem sido um principais comentadores sobre os movimentos de massas dos últimos anos. É co-editor da Fight Back! e escreve no openDemocracy.net

Marisa Holmes é uma activista e realizadora independente. Foi uma das primeiras participantes no movimento Occupy Wall Street. No 8º dia de manifestações foi presa pela polícia de Nova Iorque por estar a filmar em público.

O Mundo Amanhã: “Os documentos do Wikileaks fortaleceram-nos”

Hoje, no sexto episódio desta série, Julian Assange entrevista o presidente do Equador, Rafael Correa – que recentemente lhe concedeu asilo na embaixada do seu país, em Londres. A transmissão deste episódio resulta de uma parceria de O Informador com a Agência Pública. O Mundo Amanhã é uma produção do WikiLeaks em colaboração com o canal Russia Today

Por Agência Pública

Em Setembro, o Equador deu asilo político a Julian Assange – que já estava refugiado desde Junho na sua embaixada em Londres. Um ano antes, os telegramas da diplomacia americana no Equador tinham sido publicados, todos de uma vez, pelo WikiLeaks.

Nesta entrevista feita por videolink para a série “O Mundo Amanhã”, no início de 2012, Assange revela que o governo equatoriano procurou o WikiLeaks, na época da divulgação dos telegramas, a pedir que eles fossem todos publicados.

“Quando o WikiLeaks começou a publicar os ‘cables’ sobre o Equador, nós fizémo-lo com dois grupos de média, o El Universo e o El Comercio. O governo equatoriano procurou-nos e disse-nos: ‘queremos que vocês publiquem todos os cables sobre o Ecuador’.  O governo da Jamaica fez o mesmo. Por que nos pediu para publicar todos os documentos?”, pergunta Assange.

“Porque quem nada deve nada teme. Nós nada temos a ocultar. De facto, os [telegramas divulgados pelo] WikiLeaks fortaleceram-nos. A Embaixada dos EUA acusava-nos de sermos excessivamente nacionalistas e defendermos a soberania do governo equatoriano. E é claro que somos nacionalistas! E é claro que defendemos a soberania do Equador!” – responde prontamente o entrevistado.

A pergunta serve de introdução para Corrêa explicar sua polémica luta contra os média do Equador – o presidente é acusado de atacar a liberdade de imprensa. “Os veículos têm sido, aqui, os maiores eleitores, os maiores legisladores, os maiores juízes, os que criam a alimentam a ‘agenda’ da discussão social, os que sempre submeteram governos, presidentes, cortes de justiça, tribunais”, diz.

Eleito em 2007, o economista Rafael Correa  é considerado o presidente mais popular da história democrática do país. Inimigo declarado da política americana para a região, uma das suas primeiras atitudes no governo foi fechar uma base militar norte-americana em Manta. “Se é um assunto tão simples, se não há problema em os EUA manterem uma base militar no Equador, ok, tudo bem: permitiremos que a base de inteligência permaneça no Equador, se os EUA permitirem que estabeleçamos uma base militar do Equador em Miami”, justifica.

Críticas e ironias à política externa norte-americana e o destino político da América Latina também fazem parte da conversa.”A influência dos EUA na América Latina está a diminuir. Isso é bom. Dizemos que a América Latina está a passar, do ‘consenso de Washington’, para o consenso sem Washington”, comenta Correa.

“Talvez venha a ser o Consenso de São Paulo…”, responde imediatamente Assange.

Assista à entrevista a seguir, ou clique aqui para fazer o download do texto na íntegra.